BBA

Malvati

When one looks at the sweet innocence that envelops the face of Malvati, one can never imagine all the horrors this 13 years old has gone through. Born in a tribal community in Uttar Dinajpur, a district in West Bengal, she became a victim of human trafficking at an early stage of her life. Ever since, she had only known pain and suffering, until, finally, BBA was able to rescue her. After she was abducted from her village and sent to Delhi, she was ‘acquired’ by a ‘Naina Placement Agency’. Since then, she was forced to work at several places as domestic help. It was during that period that this child was not only mercilessly beaten, but was raped and molested by the men of the houses.

When guests came over, her body and mind were tortured even more. When she would menstruate, she would have no pads to keep herself clean. Basic requirements like nutrition and mental health became luxuries that she could only dream of. This nightmare continued for almost two years.BBA activists received information about her through an unknown mail, which told them that she was working as a domestic help at the house of a Mrs. Renu Chadha’s. Promptly, a successful raid was conducted and the girl was finally rescued. An FIR was lodged against the wrongdoers immediately. Medical examination conducted on the next day testified rape and sexual harassment. The FIR was also amended accordingly, so that proper justice could be provided to this poor child who had already lost so much. Understandably, Malvati was very fearful the day she was rescued. She was taken to Arushi Shelter Home, Gurgaon, on the orders by CWC, Gurgaon. She stayed there for two months after which she was rehabilitated. Finally, a happy chapter in her life started, she was re-united with her father, Mr. Nandulal Hasda. The tears that flowed from the father and daughter’s eyes were a silent constant reminder of what had happened to her during the two years she had been forced away from home.

Kajolata

In June 2013, an old woman, Rama , visited BBA’s office seeking help to find her granddaughter, Kajolata. 14 year old , Kajolata had come with her grandmother to explore Delhi from Assam. Belonging to a poor poor family they became easy target for the trafficers as they desperately wanted a new start in order to improve their life. They were successfully convinced by Baby*, a woman ‘agent’ engaged in ‘recruiting’ underage girls for different forms of abusive works, to let young Kajolata stay with her in order to earn some money. Attracted by the various perks promised by Baby, and seeking a lifestyle change, Kajolata convinced her grandmother to let her stay in Delhi and try her luck in the big city.

Thinking that she had handed her grandchild into safe hands, Rama left for Assam. However, she started getting worried when in spite of all her efforts, she lost contact with Kajolata, after only a short while that they went their own separate ways.After narrating her story to our team, a distraught Rama requested the team to search for Kajolata. Following the standard procedure, BBA asked her to lodge a missing person complaint with the police. Subsequently, BBA was able to track down Baby, who revealed the name of the mastermind behind that particular racket that Kajolata was a victim of: Bhanu Pratap. Already spending a jail sentence for heinous crimes like rape, he was running a full-fledged ‘placement agency’ for trafficking girls from remote areas into big cities. After BBA questioned him, he informed us of Kajolata’s whereabouts. The poor girl, who dreamt of making a beautiful life in Delhi, was forced to work as a bonded labour in a domestic household.Happy beyond words, Kajolata could hardly believe that had finally been rescued. She was made to work from morning till night, and was locked in a room where vicious guards kept an eye on her. Once again reunited with her grandmother, she could hardly wait to go back to restart her life. BBA also assisted her to receive a sum of Rs. 44,000 as back-wages from her abusive employers. Our follow up team regularly connects with her to ensure that her dreams of leading a beautiful life did not perish because of this one terrifying experience..

Amar

When parents of 13 years old Amar were told by an unknown man that their son could earn up to 5000 rupees a month, they were ecstatic. Little did they know that they were pushing their own child to the worst form of exploitation. Born in an extreme poverty in Madhubani, Bihar, Amar was like any other child of his age who loved to play all day long. His concerned parents were disappointed with his poor academic performance, and that made them even more vulnerable to cunningness of the agents that run human trafficking around such areas. Unaware that it is criminal to make underage children work, they were brainwashed into sending their child to Delhi in hope that he would be able to earn a decent amount of money.

Excited to explore a completely new city, Amar was ready to leave his home, not knowing that he may never get to see his family again. The family was also promised that they would be regularly getting Amar’s earnings.Amar’s long journey Finally after working in the factory for more than a year, fourteen boys were rescued from the factory by BBA activists. Amar was one of the lucky boys. On the CWC’s orders, the boys were sent to Mukti Ashram, where they could start a new, happy chapter of their lives. Amar received many sessions of counselling, nutritious food, education, and, once again, he was free to play as much as he wanted. When BBA was finally able to trace his origins, this child, who had lost every hope to see his parents again, was reunited with his parents. Many tears were shed, many bear hugs were shared, and Amar’s family returned home, whole once again.of pain and torment started when the trafficker brought him to a bindi making factory in Delhi. He was made to work for almost 14 hours a day with only an hour break in between. The torture was limited not just to that, he hardly good to eat nutritious food, speak to him family members or get a proper day off from work.